Earth Institute

venetia lannon

Sustainability Yes, But How?

So you want to make things “sustainable” at home or at work, and you can conceive of the changes that are needed. But do you know what it really takes to make the changes you want?

by |November 15, 2017
Rachel Patterson, MPA ’18 presents on the Secure and Resilient Water Systems Act

Students Practice What They Learn in Unique Sustainability Curriculum

A workshop in the Environmental Science and Policy MPA program challenges students to integrate their knowledge and apply it as if they were working in the field.

by |November 15, 2017
A nuclear power plant concept based on a new reactor design

Could New Nuclear Reactors Power America’s Low-Carbon Future?

A documentary featuring Earth Institute scientists suggests next-generation reactors could be a safe and clean way to replace fossil fuels.

by |November 9, 2017
The top row of images show each study region in 2005, which had abundant NOx in urban areas where human emissions are high, leading to systems where ozone formation was controlled by VOC amounts. As pollution controls were put into place on NOx emissions, by 2015, the systems in Europe, the United States, and East Asian urban areas became limited by NOx, meaning that further controls on NOx would help reduce ozone formation. 
(NASA’s Earth Observatory /Josh Stevens)

NASA Finds New Way to Track Ozone By Satellite

Ozone pollution near Earth’s surface is one of the main ingredients of summertime smog. But it not directly measurable from space, due to the abundance of ozone higher in the atmosphere, which masks the surface. Now, researchers have devised a way to use satellite measurements of the precursor gases that contribute to ozone formation to predict when and where ozone will form.

by |November 6, 2017
Replacing production of rice with other, less water-intensive crops is one of the factors that could feed more people using farmland that already exists. Photo: Amol Hatwar via Flickr

Swapping Where Crops are Grown Could Feed an Extra 825 Million People

It could also reduce water stress, according to a new study that includes 14 major food crops from around the world.

by |November 6, 2017
Researchers at the 925-ton boulder called "the bull." (Elisa Casella)

Giant Boulders on Bahamas Coast Are Evidence of Ancient Storms and Sea Level, Says Study

A new study says that storms of intensities seen today, combined with a few meters increase in sea level, were enough to transport coastal boulders weighing hundreds of tons more than 100,000 year ago.

by |November 1, 2017
(From L to R): Graça Samo, Elena Ambrosi, Alaa Murabit, Chirlane McCray, Allison Julien, Leymah Gbowee, Mikaela Luttrell Rowland.

New Columbia Program to Help Define Women’s Roles in Peace and Security

Women on all different levels, from households to the highest ranks of government, are striving to gain a seat at the table when it comes peace and security. A new program launched today at Columbia University will help define what those roles might be

by |October 27, 2017
Earth Institute Fellows design

Time is Running Out to Apply to the Earth Institute Postdoctoral Research Program

If you’re a postdoc interested in sustainable development, apply by October 31.

by |October 24, 2017
fugro-synergy2

Expedition Explores Undersea Rift off Greece

The Corinth rift is one of the most seismically active areas in Europe. Starting this month, researchers will drill into the rift to discover its past and future.

by |October 19, 2017
steve cohen

Why There’s Hope for a Sustainable Future

The Earth Institute’s Steve Cohen explains why he’s optimistic about renewable energy, despite the current political climate.

by |October 13, 2017