Climbing Mount Chirripó

by | 6.12.2014 at 3:09pm
Follow us on Facebook or Twitter

By Max Cunningham
June 7

After arriving in the town of San Gerrardo de Rivas, Mike Kaplan and I immediately started gearing up for our trek to Mount Chirripó.

Our arrival here was somewhat hectic. After landing in San Jose around 10:30 a.m., we hopped a bus to San Isidro de el General, a town just west of Chirripó National Park.  Winding through the rugged mountains of the Talamanca Range, we were treated to spectacular views of central Costa Rica’s countryside. Max 2a

Once in San Isidro de el General, we navigated our way to the local office of Ministerio de Ambiente y Energia de Costa Rica, the government agency that provides research permits for Chirripó National Park. Our contact, Marisol Rodríguez Pacheco, showed remarkable patience with our broken Spanish and helped us pull together some final requirements for the permit.

By 5 p.m., the two of us made base camp at the Cloudbridge Reserve, above the San Gerrardo de Rivas. Founded in 2002, the Cloudbridge Reserve supports researchers in Costa Rica and works towards sustainable forest management. Volunteers at the Cloudbridge Reserve provided us with a beautiful working space and a warm place to sleep.

Max 2-1

The clouds rolled in early, by 9 a.m., on their way from San Isidro de el General in the distance.

The weather here can be erratic.  During the early morning hours the sun is intense and the sky is blue; by 1 p.m. clouds roll in. You can anticipate heavy rain from 4 to 6 every day, and nights are cold.

After taking a day to gather food supplies and find porters to help us carry heavy packs up to Mount Chirripó, Mike and I set off around 4:30 a.m. to make our way to the top of Mount Chirripó before the afternoon rain.

Travelers and locals alike warned us that the hike would be strenuous, and indeed they were correct. The trail leading to Mount Chirripó is steep and rugged (although pristinely maintained), and we gained nearly 5,000 feet in elevation over nine miles of trail.

The trail leading up to Mount Chirripó around 8,000 feet is densely vegetated and humid.

The trail leading up to Mount Chirripó around 8,000 feet is densely vegetated and humid.

One especially difficult aspect of our climb was the dramatic change in climate with elevation. Below 10,000 feet, we trekked through a humid, dense rain forest, but once above about 9,500 feet, the vegetation became sparse and the temperature dropped. At the summit of Chirripó, we rarely experienced temperatures warmer than 60°F.

In terms of Earth surface processes, this dramatic change in environment invokes thoughts about difference in landscape evolution: How does change in altitude, and associated changes in climate, affect erosion processes in the long term? This is just one question we hope our research can eventually inform.

Above 10,000 feet, the climate is extremely different, and so is the terrain.  At high elevations we see broad U-shaped valleys, and cold conditions inhibit dense vegetation growth.

Above 10,000 feet, the climate is extremely different, and so is the terrain. At high elevations we see broad U-shaped valleys, and cold conditions inhibit dense vegetation growth.

After an 8.5 hour hike, we finally reached Talari Valley, a lowland about 500 feet below Mount Chirripó. We made camp at the Crestones Base Camp, a meticulously maintained hostel in the Talari Valley, near Cerro Chirripó. The Crestones Base Camp is home to many travelers seeking the thrill of climbing Mount Chirripó. Impressively, many of the hikers we encountered wake up around 2:30 a.m. to hike the remaining 5,000 feet to the peak of Cerro Chirripo to watch the sunrise over this beautiful mountain. Mike and I made no such plans, and instead rested for a busy week of fieldwork.

Max 2-5

From Crestones Base Camp, you can pick out our hostel with the green roof in this expansive view of Talari Valley.

 

Follow us on Facebook or Twitter

Comment Using Social Media

Comment