Polar Bear takes a drink (Photo credit Tim Kenna)
In 1980s and 1990s, prospecting teams worked their way northward through remote terrains, including the Canadian Rockies, where this crew member was landed by helicopter.  (Courtesy Paul Derkson)
Crew aboard the R/V Marcus G. Langseth deploy hydrophone streamers for seismic mapping of the sea floor. Courtesy of Greg Mountain.

Photo Essay: The Mystery of North American Diamonds

A pack of two adult wolves and five pups was recently spotted near Mt. Shasta, apparently new arrivals from Oregon. Photo: California Department of Fish and Wildlife.

How Climate Influences Wolf Recovery in California

Some evidence suggests that the glaciers on Mt. Shasta might have something to do with the location of a newly-spotted wolf pack in northern California.

by |August 26, 2015
Transforming data into useful maps may help urban planners deal with Nairobi's chronic congestion. Photo: Kevin Krajick

Map & App Help People Track Transit in Nairobi

Commuters and others traveling in and around Nairobi often rely on an unofficial network of minibuses and minivans, called matatus, that have no centrally controlled schedules, fares or route plans. But a new application developed for use on cellphones with Google Maps can now help them find their way.

by |August 26, 2015
Polar Bear takes a drink (Photo credit Tim Kenna)

Moving into the Realm of the Polar Bear

When we venture into the Arctic for research for most of us there is the lingering hope that a polar bear will appear on our watch; at least as long as we are safely outside of its reach.

by |August 24, 2015
Interns

Apply to Work as an Intern in the Executive Director’s Office

Are you an undergraduate or graduate student at Columbia or Barnard interested in sustainability and the environment? Are you looking for a paid internship for the fall? Apply by this Friday, August 28th, to intern in the Executive Director’s office.

by |August 24, 2015
In 1980s and 1990s, prospecting teams worked their way northward through remote terrains, including the Canadian Rockies, where this crew member was landed by helicopter.  (Courtesy Paul Derkson)

Photo Essay: The Mystery of North American Diamonds

People have been finding loose diamonds across the United States and Canada since the early 1800s, but for the most part, no one knows where they came from. It was not until the 1990s that geologists tracked down the first commercial deposits, on the remote tundra of Canada’s Northwest Territories. Yaakov Weiss, a geochemist at Columbia University’s Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, is investigating the origins of these rich diamond mines.

by |August 24, 2015