New York subway construction in the beginning of the 20th century. Aging infrastructure hampers the system's efficiency. Photo: NY Public Library Digital Collections
Modern mapping shows a mid-ocean ridge running from the top of the image to the bottom, with two transform faults perpendicular to the ridge. Via GeoMapApp
A new statistical method inspired by economics is helping scientists identify old volcanic eruptions through temperature changes. Photo: Volcano in Papua New Guinea, by Taro Taylor/CC-BY-2.0

Walter Pitman and the Smoking Gun of Plate Tectonics

“As the Marshall Islands and several other small island states around the world struggle with saltwater intrusion into their fields and a dwindling fresh water supply, a future abroad is beginning to creep into the minds of local residents,” Eric Holthaus writes for Columbia Law School Magazine.

As Predicted: A Rising Tide of Migration

“With sea levels on the rise, several island nations are scrambling to stay above water and ensure citizens will have a place to go when the ocean engulfs their homeland. The humanitarian-crisis phase of climate change has officially begun.”

by |April 29, 2016
La Niña Climate Impacts

Learning from El Niño as La Niña Odds Rise

Although El Niño is weakening, its ramifications continue to be felt around the world. Drought and resulting food insecurity is one of the major implications for southeast Asia, eastern and southern Africa, Central America and the Caribbean. Sixty million are in need of emergency relief today, according to the United Nations.

by |April 28, 2016
Richard Horsch

Faculty Profile: Richard Horsch

Teaching in the MSSM program provides faculty member Richard Horsch an opportunity to interact with students who have a passion for protecting the environment and for whom a working knowledge of law and policy would form an important part of their ability to succeed.

by |April 28, 2016
Climate-tablegroup

ESP Alumna Joins Climate Leadership Corps

Olivia Owre-Bell, a recent alumna of Columbia’s MPA in Environmental Science and Policy program, attended the Climate Reality Leadership Corps 31st training in the Philippines this March.

by |April 28, 2016
Meltwater rivers on the greenland ice sheet. M. Tedesco/Columbia University

In Greenland, Exactly Where Meltwater Enters the Ocean Matters

In southern Greenland in summer, rivers have been streaming off the ice sheet, pouring cold fresh water into the fjords. A new study tracks where that meltwater goes—with surprising results.

by |April 25, 2016