Ocean waves interact with large-scale currents in this snapshot taken from a new NASA simulation. Oceanographers eager to explore it are hampered by inadequate computing power. Image: Dimitris Menemenlis/NASA’s JPL and Chris Hill/MIT
soildoc video snip
lightning snip 2

Linking Climate Forecasts, Soil Testing for Smarter Farming

The AUV Sentry discovered an area of seafloor where methane is bubbling up, similar to the earlier photo. The data will be used to plan the team's next dive with scientists inside a submersible. Photo: NOAA

Roving the Abyss: It Takes a Team

Bridgit’s first AUV mission was a rousing success, including locating a patch of seafloor where methane is bubbling up.

by |July 29, 2016
Lamont's Bridgit Boulahanis, Sentry Coordinator for the research training cruise, gives a presentation to the ship's science party and telepresence group. Sentry is a UAV that the team is using to explore the sea floor. Photo courtesy of Bridgit Boulahanis

When Doing Science at Sea, Prepare to Adapt

Bridgit’s research training cruise started with a fundamental lesson of ocean science: Science at sea requires constant adaptation. Morning fog meant rewriting dive plans and reconsidering priorities.

by |July 29, 2016
Scientists can experience the sea floor up close in the human-operated vehicle Alvin. Photo: Bridgit Boulahanis

Going Deep for Science

Bridgit Boulahanis, a marine geophysics graduate student at Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, prepares to head out on her first research cruise exploring the seafloor with underwater vehicles.

by |July 28, 2016
MSSM Professor Ralph Schmidt

The Business and Ecology of Sustainable Forestry

Read about new MSSM Faculty member Ralph Schmidt, and how he will bring his expertise to the classroom in fall 2016 with a new course: The Business and Ecology of Sustainable Forestry.

by |July 28, 2016
Atlantic cod, Gadus morhua. Photo: Hans-Petter Fjeld via Wikimedia Commons.

Climate and Cod

A new study finds that the climatological phenomenon known as the North Atlantic Oscillation contributes to fluctuations in the cod population off the New England coast, and could help fishery managers protect the population from future collapse.

by |July 27, 2016