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Floods, Companies and Supply Chain Risk

Global companies with long supply chains could do a much better job of managing climate disaster risk, according to a recently published study from the Columbia Water Center.

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Ebola worker Monrovia, Liberia. Photo: Caroline Van Nespen/Medecins Sans Frontieres

Money, Power and the Media in the Ebola Crisis

The Ebola crisis has serious implications for governments, the private sector, and public messengers. To address these issues, and to assess the state of the science behind the Ebola crisis, The Earth Institute has sponsored two discussions recently.

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Kennedy Space Center. Photo: NASA

Study: NASA Sites Vulnerable to Climate Change

NASA has been at the forefront of climate science, launching satellites that take the pulse of Earth’s land, oceans and atmospheric systems. But the agency is increasingly vulnerable itself to the effects of a changing climate.

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Black Rock Forest

Agreement with NY State Protects Black Rock Forest

New York State will acquire a conservation easement for the Black Rock Forest, protecting the 3,800-acre preserve 50 miles north of New York City for both public use and scientific research.

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keleman oman rock closeup KK

Alma Mater’s Other Secret: a Way Forward on Climate

Sitting on the iconic front steps of Low Library, Alma Mater rests on a plinth that offers a clue to a possible method of carbon sequestration, a vital technology for addressing our problem of too much CO2.

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Why are Past Surface Temperatures and CO2 Concentrations Important?

by | 11.26.2014 at 3:36pm
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By burning fossil fuels for heating, electricity, transportation and other purposes, humans add CO2 to the atmosphere. Yet, by comparing ways in which the Earth’s temperature, CO2 concentration, sea level and ice sheets have changed in the past, we are able to learn valuable lessons about the climate system of today and tomorrow.

This Bird Flies South for the Winter

by | 11.24.2014 at 11:39pm
IcePod team at South Pole (left to right) Scott Brown, Chris Bertinato, Tej Dhakal, unidentified, Winnie Chu (photo by R. Bell)

Migrating south in the winter is a behavior that Antarctic scientists share with many species of birds, although the scientists fly just a bit further south. For the IcePod team it was time to join the migration so they could test their equipment in the most challenging environment the Earth has to offer.

MPA Alumnus Honored With NASPAA Spotlight Award

by | 11.21.2014 at 1:00pm
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Todd Miner, a 2011 alumnus of the MPA in Environmental Science and Policy program, was honored by the Network of Schools of Public Policy, Affairs, and Administration (NASPAA) for his work as the Director of Friends of Rockaway, an organization devoted to recovery after Superstorm Sandy in 2012.

Apply Now for Spring Curriculum Grading Assistant Posts

by | 11.20.2014 at 5:02pm

The Sustainability Management program is seeking candidates for the following curriculum and grading assistant positions for the spring 2015 semester. The assistants are responsible for attending class sessions, holding weekly office hours for students, addressing student inquiries, reviewing course material with the instructor, and assisting in the grading of problem sets and examinations. The stipend for these positions for spring 2015 is $5,000.

Sounds of Seismology

by | 11.17.2014 at 11:49am
SeismoDome

Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory scientist Ben Holtzman grew up discovering science through interactive exhibits in San Francisco’s Exploratorium and now provides a similar experience for others. Holtzman designs immersive shows that allow people to experience what earthquakes and seismic waves look and sound like as they move through and around the Earth. On Monday, November 17th at the American Museum of Natural History Hayden Planetarium, Holtzman and his collaborators will present one of these shows, the second installment of SeismoDome: Sights and Sounds of Global Seismology.

Iubeste-ti Riul: How ‘Love Your River’ Is Spreading Environmental Stewardship in Moldova

by | 11.17.2014 at 11:04am
High school students from Chisinau involved in biological water quality monitoring and the co-leaders of NEC showing off a “Love Your River!” sign.  Aquanauts members in the photo (left to right) include Kalena Gravina: Aquanauts Vice-President and MSSM Candidate, Juan Colombo: Aquanauts Finance & Development Officer and MSSM Candidate, and Alex VandenBroek: Aquanauts President and MSSM Candidate.

Where roads cross the Bic River in the country of Moldova, you will likely notice “Love Your River” signs. It is a simple unclaimed request, devoid of self-promotion yet very personal to all that read it. In these three simple, yet profound words, those signs tell the story of the National Environmental Center (NEC), a four member NGO working to persuade their country to adopt water stewardship in a place where both political and physical infrastructures have long been neglected. This past August, members of the Columbia Aquanauts student group traveled to Moldova for a week to work with NEC and learn about the country’s environmental issues.

Floods, Companies and Supply Chain Risk

by | 11.17.2014 at 9:15am
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Global companies with long supply chains could do a much better job of managing climate disaster risk, according to a recently published study from the Columbia Water Center.