Photo: Javier Gil
Tree ring research was a young field in 1975 when Ed Cook (above, in Nepal) and Gordon Jacoby founded the Tree Ring Lab at Lamont. The Lab would become a world leader in tree ring sampling and analysis and a source of technology and training for dendrochronologists around the world. Photo by Paul Krusic
Traffic jams like this one in Monrovia, Liberia, are one challenge for sustainable urban development, one of the topics of the Earth Institute Practicum series this fall. Photo: UN/Christopher Herwig

Translating Nature’s Historians: The Tree Ring Lab Turns 40


Cuomo’s Commitment to Addressing Climate Change

New York State has taken a progressive stand on climate change, pushing for renewable energy development and promising to curb greenhouse gas emissions. On Thursday, Gov. Andrew Cuomo, joined by Vice President Al Gore at Columbia University, announced several new actions to increase New York State’s commitment to fighting climate change.

by |October 9, 2015
card polar bear thumbnail

A Game of Strategy and Survival in the High Arctic

EcoChains: Arctic Crisis is a card game for ages 10 and up that challenges players to strategically manage the Arctic marine ecosystem as climate changes, while they learn about the potential impacts of future changes.

by |October 9, 2015
Somali children play in a child-friendly space supported by UNICEF and run by Save the Children US in the Kobe refugee camp in Ethiopia, in 2012. Some 27,000 refugees from drought and conflict were residing in the camp. Photo: UNICEF

Certificate Program to Focus on Environment and Security

A new professional certificate program at Columbia University will address the linkages between environment and security, aimed at practitioners with responsibility for providing assessments and warnings regarding environment-security risks or for designing programs to manage such risks.

by |October 5, 2015

Photo Essay: Rising Islands, Monster Wave

Researchers at Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory have published a new study showing that a tsunami of unimaginable size swept over the Cape Verde Islands some 73,000 years ago. The discovery may have implications for the potential for modern hazards.  READ THE FULL SCIENTIFIC STORY

by |October 2, 2015
Wind speed probability map from NOAA for Hurricane Joaquin.

Joaquin? There’s No Perfect Forecast, So Stay Tuned

What will Hurricane Joaquin do? The science of predicting that is getting better, but still uncertain. The debate today is over whether there will be a U.S. landfall now in five or more days’ time or not; 30 years ago there would have been no point in even having that discussion.

by |September 30, 2015