The images were taken aboard the R/V Langseth on a 2008 expedition to the East Pacific Rise. (Marjanovic)

Volcanic Plumbing at Mid-Ocean Ridges Goes Far Deeper than Thought

New pictures in the journal Nature Geoscience may help resolve a debate about how new crust forms at mid-ocean ridges where earth’s tectonic plates are slowly pulling apart.

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Squid-like cephalopods ruled the oceans in the Ordovician. Image: University of Michigan Museum of Natural History

Watch Your Step: the Alpha Predator of the Ordovician

Frozen into the stone floor of a stairway landing, several flights up in Columbia’s Lewisohn Hall, sits a stark reminder of how life has evolved in the sea. Part 6 of the Columbia Geology Tour.

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MPA Program Announces Full Fellowship Opportunity—Apply Now

The Master of Public Administration in Environmental Science and Policy program now offers its first full-tuition grant, the Dean’s Environmental Science and Policy Fellowship. Apply by Nov. 1 for early admission.

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Deerfire_

What Do Wildfires Have to Do with Climate Change?

“Climate change has been making the fire season in the United States longer and on average more intense,” said John Holdren, President Obama’s science advisor. And, wildfires are not only intensified by climate change, they also exacerbate it.

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Sebastião Salgado, Iceberg between Paulet Island and the South Shetland Islands on the Antarctic Channel. At sea level, earlier flotation levels are clearly visible where the ice has been polished by the ocean’s constant movement. High above, a shape resembling a castle tower has been carved by wind erosion and detached pieces of ice. The Antarctic Peninsula, 2005. © Sebastião Salgado/Amazonas images—Contact Press Images.

The Art and Science of Climate Change

This fall, the photographs of Sebastião Salgado provide the springboard for an ambitious program of panel discussions, lectures and film screenings addressing the urgent issue of climate change, at the International Center of Photography in New York City.

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The use of smartphones by community health workers will be a key component of tracking Ebola cases. Photo: One Million Community Health Workers Campaign.

Millennium Promise Team to Join Battle Against Ebola

Locally based community health workers, who bring vital primary health care to underserved populations across sub-Saharan Africa, will join the battle against the deadly Ebola virus through a partnership between the government of Guinea and The Earth Institute.

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Eco-Theater Engages Visitors at Lamont-Doherty’s Open House

by | 10.22.2014 at 3:32pm
Superhero Clubhouse Performs "Salty Folk"
Photo Credit: Jane Rebecca Marchant

Visitors to Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory’s open house on Oct. 11 could tune in to a performance of “Salty Folk” by Superhero Clubhouse, a collective of artists and environmental advocates. Created by Jeremy Pickard and Nate Weida, the play uses music and humor to illustrate the history and importance of New York Harbor through the “eyes” of five oysters: Brook, Manny, Bronxy, Queeny and Stats.

Administrative Internship in the Executive Director’s Office

by | 10.22.2014 at 10:21am
Butler

The Office of the Executive Director at the Earth Institute is seeking an intern to provide administrative support during the work week. Intern tasks include administrative work such as correspondence, scheduling, phone and desk coverage, photocopying, mailings, and errands. The intern may also be asked to provide research support to the team, including compiling and editing reports and presentations, as well as support in planning and executing Executive Director’s events, meetings, conferences, and seminars.

Volcanic Plumbing at Mid-Ocean Ridges Goes Far Deeper than Thought

by | 10.21.2014 at 12:01pm
The images were taken aboard the R/V Langseth on a 2008 expedition to the East Pacific Rise. (Marjanovic)

New pictures in the journal Nature Geoscience may help resolve a debate about how new crust forms at mid-ocean ridges where earth’s tectonic plates are slowly pulling apart.

Cohen: China’s Pollution Problems Mirroring U.S. Experience

by | 10.20.2014 at 5:50pm
Cohen Steven CCTV 101814

China’s problems with air pollution mirror what the United States went through during the rapid economic growth following World War II, and the solutions will likely be the same, Earth Institute Executive Director Steven Cohen said Saturday on an English-language news program on China Central Television.

Watch Your Step: the Alpha Predator of the Ordovician

by | 10.20.2014 at 12:00pm
Squid-like cephalopods ruled the oceans in the Ordovician. Image: University of Michigan Museum of Natural History

Frozen into the stone floor of a stairway landing, several flights up in Columbia’s Lewisohn Hall, sits a stark reminder of how life has evolved in the sea. Part 6 of the Columbia Geology Tour.

M.S. Professor Looks to Past for Future Drought Mitigation

by | 10.17.2014 at 12:41pm
A dust storm engulfs Stratford, Texas in April of 1935. The drought of 1934 was likely made worse by dust storms triggered by the poor agricultural practices of the time.
Credit: NOAA/George E. Marsh Album

M.S. in Sustainability Management professor Ben Cook often tells his students that the past can provide critical lessons for how we manage sustainability challenges now and in the future. Thus, it is not surprising that Cook, whose research at the Earth Institute’s Lamont-Dougherty Earth Observatory focuses on drought, hydroclimate, and interactions between the land surface and climate system, recently found that the drought of 1934 was caused in part by an atmospheric phenomenon that may also be the reason for California’s current drought. Cook, along with fellow climate scientists Richard Seager and Jason Smerdon, focus on the 1934 drought in a study that was featured by the American Geophysical Union (AGU).

MPA Program Announces Full Fellowship Opportunity—Apply Now

by | 10.17.2014 at 12:30pm
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The Master of Public Administration in Environmental Science and Policy program now offers its first full-tuition grant, the Dean’s Environmental Science and Policy Fellowship. Apply by Nov. 1 for early admission.